Bastiaan Driehuys

Bastiaan Driehuys

Professor of Radiology

Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering (Secondary)

Professor of Physics (Secondary)

Office Location: 
161-B Bryan Research, 311 Research Drive, Durham, NC 27710
Front Office Address: 
Box 3302 Med Ctr, Durham, NC 27710
Phone: 
(919) 684-7786

Overview

My research program is focused on developing and applying hyperpolarized gases to enable fundamentally new applications in MRI. Currently we use this technology to non-invasively image pulmonary function in 3D. Hyperpolarization involves aligning nuclei to a high degree to enhance their MRI signal by 5-6 orders of magnitude. Thus, despite the low density of gases relative to water (the ordinary signal source in MRI), they can be imaged at high-resolution in a single breath. This technology leads to a host of interesting areas of study including: investigating the basic physics of hyperpolarization, developing new MR methods and hardware for image acquisition, image analysis and quantification, and of, course applying this technology to a host of chronic diseases including, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and pulmonary fibrosis.

Education & Training

  • Ph.D., Princeton University 1995

Ebner, Lukas, et al. “The role of hyperpolarized 129xenon in MR imaging of pulmonary function.Eur J Radiol, vol. 86, Jan. 2017, pp. 343–52. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.ejrad.2016.09.015. Full Text

Driehuys, Bastiaan. “Crossing the Chasm(s): Demonstrating the Clinical Value of Hyperpolarized Gas MRI.Acad Radiol, vol. 24, no. 1, Jan. 2017, pp. 1–3. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.acra.2016.11.002. Full Text

He, Mu, et al. “Using Hyperpolarized 129Xe MRI to Quantify the Pulmonary Ventilation Distribution.Acad Radiol, vol. 23, no. 12, Dec. 2016, pp. 1521–31. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.acra.2016.07.014. Full Text

Subashi, E., et al. “TH-EF-BRA-10: High Spatiotemporal Resolution Self-Sorted 4D MRI.Med Phys, vol. 43, no. 6, June 2016, p. 3899. Pubmed, doi:10.1118/1.4958267. Full Text

Kaushik, S. Sivaram, et al. “Single-breath clinical imaging of hyperpolarized (129)Xe in the airspaces, barrier, and red blood cells using an interleaved 3D radial 1-point Dixon acquisition.Magn Reson Med, vol. 75, no. 4, Apr. 2016, pp. 1434–43. Pubmed, doi:10.1002/mrm.25675. Full Text

Dahhan, Talal, et al. “Abnormalities in hyperpolarized (129)Xe magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy in two patients with pulmonary vascular disease.Pulm Circ, vol. 6, no. 1, Mar. 2016, pp. 126–31. Pubmed, doi:10.1086/685110. Full Text

He, Mu, et al. “Dose and pulse sequence considerations for hyperpolarized (129)Xe ventilation MRI.Magn Reson Imaging, vol. 33, no. 7, Sept. 2015, pp. 877–85. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.mri.2015.04.005. Full Text

Robertson, S. H., et al. “Optimizing 3D noncartesian gridding reconstruction for hyperpolarized 129Xe MRI-focus on preclinical applications.” Concepts in Magnetic Resonance Part A: Bridging Education and Research, vol. 44, no. 4, July 2015, pp. 190–202. Scopus, doi:10.1002/cmr.a.21352. Full Text

Roos, Justus E., et al. “Hyperpolarized Gas MR Imaging: Technique and Applications.Magn Reson Imaging Clin N Am, vol. 23, no. 2, May 2015, pp. 217–29. Pubmed, doi:10.1016/j.mric.2015.01.003. Full Text

Pages

MILLER, D. J., et al. “MICROSTRUCTURE OF SPUTTERED SUPERCONDUCTING FILMS OF BI2SR2CACU2OX MADE BY LOW-TEMPERATURE, INSITU GROWTH.” High Temperature Superconducting Compounds Ii, edited by S. H. WHANG et al., MINERALS, METALS & MATERIALS SOC, 1990, pp. 329–39.

KAMPWIRTH, R. T., et al. “INSITU GROWTH OF SUPERCONDUCTING FILMS OF BI SR CA CU O USING MAGNETRON SPUTTERING.” Science and Technology of Thin Film Superconductors 2, edited by R. D. MCCONNELL and R. NOUFI, PLENUM PRESS DIV PLENUM PUBLISHING CORP, 1990, pp. 39–46.

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