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Applications of Physics: A modern perspective

Intended principally for students in engineering and the physical sciences as a continuation of PHYSICS 152L. Topics include: mechanics from a microscopic perspective, the atomic nature of matter, energy, energy quantization, entropy, the kinetic theory of gases, the efficiency of engines, electromagnetic radiation, the photon nature of light, physical optics and interference, waves and particles, applications of wave mechanics. Not open to students having credit for PHYSICS 142L or 162L. Prerequisites: PHYSICS 152L and MATH 212 or the equivalents. One course.

Introductory Electricity, Magnetism, and Optics

Intended principally for students in engineering and the physical sciences. Topics include: electric charge, electric fields, Gauss's Law, potential, capacitance, electrical current, resistance, circuit concepts, magnetic fields, magnetic and electric forces, Ampere's Law, magnetic induction, Faraday's Law, inductance, Maxwell's Equations, electromagnetic waves, elementary geometric optics, wave interference, and diffraction. Prerequisites: PHYSICS 151L and MATH 122 or equivalents. One course.

Introductory Mechanics

The fundamentals of classic physics. Topics include: vectors, units, Newton's Laws, static equilibrium, motion in one and two dimensions, rotation, conservation of momentum, work and energy, gravity, simple and chaotic oscillations. Numerical methods used to solve problems in a workstation environment. Intended principally for non-physics majors in the physical sciences and engineering. Students planning a major in physics should enroll instead in PHYSICS 161L, 162L in their freshman year. Closed to students having credit for PHYSICS 141L or 161L.

General Physics II

The second semester of a calculus-based course for students in health or life sciences. Core topics: electric fields, circuits, magnetic fields, Faraday's law, Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic waves, properties of light, geometric optics, wave optics. Additional possible topics: optical instrumentation, quantum physics, selected applications. Students must enroll in PHYSICS 142LA lecture, lab and discussion sections to receive credit. Closed to students having credit for PHYSICS 152L, 153L or 162D. Prerequisites: PHYSICS 141L, 141LA, 151L, or 161D.

General Physics II

The second semester of a calculus-based course for students in health or life sciences. Core topics: electric fields, circuits, magnetic fields, Faraday's law, Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic waves, properties of light, geometric optics, wave optics. Additional possible topics: optical instrumentation, quantum physics, selected applications. Students must enroll in a lecture (PHYSICS 142L), a lab (PHYSICS 142L9), and a discussion section (PHYSICS 142L9D) to receive credit. Closed to students having credit for PHYSICS 152L, 153L or 162D. Prerequisites: PHYSICS 141L, 151L, or 161D.

General Physics I

First part of a two-semester calculus-based course for students in health or life sciences. Core topics: kinematics, dynamics, systems of particles, conservation laws, statics, fluids, oscillations, waves. Other possible topics: sound, diffusion, thermodynamics, selected applications. For credit, enrollment in PHYSICS 141LA lecture, lab and discussion sections required. Physics majors should enroll in PHYSICS 161D/161L, 162D/162L in their freshman year. Closed to students with credit for PHYSICS 151L, 152L, 161D. Prerequisites: one year of college calculus such as MATH 105L, 106L, 21.

General Physics I

First part of a two-semester calculus-based course for students in health or life sciences. Core topics: kinematics, dynamics, systems of particles, conservation laws, statics, fluids, oscillations, waves. Additional possible topics: sound, diffusion, thermodynamics, selected applications. For credit, enrollment in PHYSICS 141L, and lab and discussion sections (PHYSICS 141L9, 141D) required. Physics majors should enroll in PHYSICS 161D/161L, 162D/162L in their freshman year. Closed to students with credit for PHYSICS 151L, 152L, 161D.

Physics Research and the Economy

Analyses of the role of physics in the development of commercial technologies, with emphasis on curiosity driven research. Seminar requiring independent investigations of the intellectual origin of technological devices, with equal attention to physics principles and political or socioeconomic influences on research funding and product development. No prior instruction in physics assumed. One course.

Energy in the 21st Century and Beyond

Concepts of energy from a scientific perspective for understanding problems of energy conversion, storage, and transmission in modern society. Topics include fundamental concepts (kinetic and potential energy, heat, basic thermodynamics, mass-energy equivalence), established power generation methods and their environmental impacts, emerging and proposed technologies (solar, wind, tidal, advanced fusion concepts). Final team project. Sophomores, juniors, and seniors from non-science majors are particularly encouraged to attend; no previous knowledge of physics is assumed. One course.

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