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Introduction to Frontiers of Biophysics

Once-per-week class with goal of introducing students to representative frontiers of biophysics. Course will be a mixture of presentations by researchers, presentations by students of journal articles, and some lab tours. Prerequisites: Knowledge equivalent to Advanced Placement courses in biology, chemistry and physics, or with permission of the instructor. Half course.

Introductory Experimental Physics II

Second in series of half-courses on experimental physics techniques for physics and biophysics majors. Focus on core physics concepts of electricity, magnetism and optics: electrostatics, magnetostatics, magnetic induction, electromagnetic waves, geometrical and physical optics. Students work in teams and use computers to collect, visualize, and analyze data.

Fundamentals of Physics II

Second semester of a two-semester sequence intended for potential physics or biophysics majors. Course discusses basic principles and applications of electrodynamics, including electric fields, Gauss's Law, electric potential, capacitance, DC and AC circuits, magnetic fields, Ampere's Law, electric and magnetic forces, magnetic induction, Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic waves, properties of light, ray optics, and wave optics. Prerequisites: PHYSICS 161D and MATH 122 or consent from instructor. Recommended that course is taken concurrently with PHYSICS 162L. One course.

Introductory Experimental Physics I

First in a series of half-courses on experimental physics techniques for physics and biophysics majors. Experiments focus on core physics concepts of mechanics: force, motion, conservation laws, and oscillations. Students work in teams and use computers to collect, visualize, and analyze data. Key components: written documentation of experimental procedures and results in a scientific notebook; interpreting results and testing hypotheses; experimental design and refinement; multiple opportunities for open-ended laboratory activities that inspire team and individual creativity.

Fundamentals of Physics I

First semester of a two-semester sequence intended for potential physics or biophysics majors. Course discusses vector algebra, description of motion, Newton's laws, work and energy, systems of particles, conservation laws, rotation, gravity, mechanics of fluids, oscillations, mechanical waves, and sound. Prerequisites: MATH 21 and 122 or equivalents; MATH 122 may be taken concurrently. Recommended that course is taken concurrently with PHYSICS 161L. One course.

Applications of Physics: A modern perspective

Intended principally for students in engineering and the physical sciences as a continuation of PHYSICS 152L. Topics include: mechanics from a microscopic perspective, the atomic nature of matter, energy, energy quantization, entropy, the kinetic theory of gases, the efficiency of engines, electromagnetic radiation, the photon nature of light, physical optics and interference, waves and particles, applications of wave mechanics. Not open to students having credit for PHYSICS 142L or 162L. Prerequisites: PHYSICS 152L and MATH 212 or the equivalents. One course.

Introductory Electricity, Magnetism, and Optics

Intended principally for students in engineering and the physical sciences. Topics include: electric charge, electric fields, Gauss's Law, potential, capacitance, electrical current, resistance, circuit concepts, magnetic fields, magnetic and electric forces, Ampere's Law, magnetic induction, Faraday's Law, inductance, Maxwell's Equations, electromagnetic waves, elementary geometric optics, wave interference, and diffraction. Prerequisites: PHYSICS 151L and MATH 122 or equivalents. One course.

Introductory Mechanics

The fundamentals of classic physics. Topics include: vectors, units, Newton's Laws, static equilibrium, motion in one and two dimensions, rotation, conservation of momentum, work and energy, gravity, simple and chaotic oscillations. Numerical methods used to solve problems in a workstation environment. Intended principally for non-physics majors in the physical sciences and engineering. Students planning a major in physics should enroll instead in PHYSICS 161L, 162L in their freshman year. Closed to students having credit for PHYSICS 141L or 161L.

General Physics II

The second semester of a calculus-based course for students in health or life sciences. Core topics: electric fields, circuits, magnetic fields, Faraday's law, Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic waves, properties of light, geometric optics, wave optics. Additional possible topics: optical instrumentation, quantum physics, selected applications. Students must enroll in PHYSICS 142LA lecture, lab and discussion sections to receive credit. Closed to students having credit for PHYSICS 152L, 153L or 162D. Prerequisites: PHYSICS 141L, 141LA, 151L, or 161D.

General Physics II

The second semester of a calculus-based course for students in health or life sciences. Core topics: electric fields, circuits, magnetic fields, Faraday's law, Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic waves, properties of light, geometric optics, wave optics. Additional possible topics: optical instrumentation, quantum physics, selected applications. Students must enroll in a lecture (PHYSICS 142L), a lab (PHYSICS 142L9), and a discussion section (PHYSICS 142L9D) to receive credit. Closed to students having credit for PHYSICS 152L, 153L or 162D. Prerequisites: PHYSICS 141L, 151L, or 161D.

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