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Class Related Pages

Things on the site itself that may be of interest to students or philosophers of any age or generation include complete online books of poetry, various support materials for the study of physics, and links related to beowulfery. All materials on this site that are authored by Robert G. Brown are Copyright 2004. The details of their Open Public License (modified) can be viewed here. If you use or enjoy anything at all on this site -- free textbooks, stories, programs, or other resources, consider hitting to help spread the word so others can find it as well. Note, Robert G. Brown is generally either rgb or rgbatduke on many external sites crosslinked here.


My Books:

My Books


Home Physics 41 Physics 42 Physics 53 Physics 53 (Summer) Physics 54 Physics 54 (Summer) Physics 55 (Summer)
Introductory Physics I Review Problems for Intro Physics I Introductory Physics II Equations du Jour (Old Intro Physics II) Review Problems for Intro Physics II Introductory Physics III Mathematics for Introductory Physics Classical Electrodynamics
Physics 319 Physics 231: Mathematical Methods for Physics Videos of Physics 53 Lectures One Page Calculus Review Identities for Electrodynamics Contact About


Physics and Mathematics Textbooks

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Introductory Physics I -- Mechanics and Thermodynamics

Introductory Physics I -- Mechanics is provided for the benefit of all students or teachers of physics, at Duke or elsewhere for their personal use and for the exclusive purpose of teaching or learning physics. This textbook may not be printed and sold for a profit without the permission of the author. This textbook may not be electronically redistributed without the permission of the author.



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Introductory Physics II -- Electromagnetism and Optics

Introductory Physics II -- Electromagnetism and Optics is an online, lecture note style textbook provided for the benefit of my physics class here at Duke. All students or faculty who discover it online are welcome to use and peruse this textbook online or as a e-book on their own personal computer for the sole purpose of teaching or learning physics.

If you do this, I do ask that you to help others find the resource, as it is my goal here is to provide a professional grade physics textbook that can be used at little or no cost by all of the students of physics, all over the world, which does no one any good if they cannot find it.

All other use must conform to the Open Publication License published on this website, which prohibits making and redistributing printed or electronically reproduced copies of this work for your own use or (especially) for commercial purposes without my specific permission.



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Mathematics for Introductory Physics

Mathematics for Introductory Physics is an online, lecture note style textbook provided for the benefit of my physics classes here at Duke. All students or faculty (at Duke or otherwise) who discover it online are welcome to use and peruse this textbook online or as a e-book on their own personal computer for the sole purpose of teaching or learning mathematics and/or physics.

If you do this, I do ask that you to help others find the resource, as it is my goal here is to provide a mathematical supplement professional grade physics textbooks that can be used at little or no cost by all of the students of physics, all over the world, which does no one any good if they cannot find it.

All other use must conform to the Open Publication License published on this website, which prohibits making and redistributing printed or electronically reproduced copies of this work either for your own use or (especially) for commercial purposes without my specific permission.



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Classical Electrodynamics

Classical Electrodynamics is an online, lecture note style textbook provided for the benefit of my physics classes here at Duke. All students or faculty who discover it online are welcome to use and peruse this textbook online or as a e-book on their own personal computer for the sole purpose of teaching or learning physics.

All other use must conform to the Open Publication License published on this website, which prohibits making and redistributing printed or electronically reproduced copies of this work for your own use or commercial purposes.

Note that this textbook is loosely derived from several sources, particularly J. D. Jackson's Classical Electrodynamics, 2nd and 3rd editions (for which it serves as a study companion that can in a pinch stand alone). However, it is significantly augmented in many places, most notably in its discussion of vector spherical harmonics and Hansen functions, which is derived from Larry Biedenharn's notes on the subject, and in its discussion of radiation reaction and both the Dirac and the Wheeler and Feynman papers. It has also been laboriously converted so that its units are SI throughout, where Jackson is only half converted from the Gaussian units of its early editions.

It also has significantly more material supporting the learning of the required mathematics by the student. Perhaps when Jackson's original book was written, one could be confident that a physics graduate student was versed in tensors and number theory, in partial differential equations and vector calculus. It is at least my experience that this is no longer particularly likely to be so (with a few welcome exceptions in any given class, of course). Tensors and tensor concepts such as outer products and dyads in particular are simply no longer taught at all to most physics majors, which makes learning their use and notation in e.g. relativity theory quite a chore. I have therefore included sections that review the ideas underlying tensors in some detail, as well as sections that review e.g. contour integration and complex variables for students that might be weak there.

For better or worse, classical electrodynamics at the graduate level always ends up being a course in remedial mathematics as much as it ever is in physics, and this textbook attempts in its own small way to give students the resources they need to learn what they are missing on their own without wasting valuable classroom time.



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Mathematical Methods for Physics

Physics 231 Notes (Mathematical Methods of Physics) is provided for pretty much anyone. These are old lecture notes for the Math 231 course I taught for a year or two. They are obsolete in the sense that they will be subsumed directly into the Classical Electrodynamics book and/or the Mathematics book.




Class Links

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Physics 41 Syllabus

Syllabus for Introductory Physics I (41) is provided for the benefit of my current (fall 2005) Duke Physics Class. Others who discover it online are welcome to use and peruse it and associated resources online for the purpose of teaching or learning physics. All other use must conform to the Open Publication License published on this website.



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Physics 42 Syllabus

Syllabus for Introductory Physics II (42) is provided for the benefit of my current (spring 2007) Duke Physics Class. Others who discover it online are welcome to use and peruse it and associated resources online for the purpose of teaching or learning physics. All other use must conform to the Open Publication License published on this website.



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Physics 53 Syllabus

Physics 53 Resources are provided for the benefit of the students taking Physics 53 from me during the regular semester at Duke. Others who discover them online are welcome to use and peruse them and the associated other resources online for the purpose of teaching or learning physics.

Students should probably download copies of each of the following PDFs:

  • The course syllabus. This describes what we will cover in very broad terms and tells you how the couse is divided up into logical sections.
  • The course schedule. This is a week-by-week guide to the course, with the dates for the homework and exams (and certain other important dates) laid out. This schedule is not written in stone and may be changed as circumstances dictate during the semester, but it is a pretty good estimate of where we'll be, when, for the time being.
  • The course grading scheme. This describes how the assigned work and exams will be graded and how the scores will contribute to your overall grade. It is very important to look at this early, so that you can see how to succeed in the course in a way that lives up to your expectations.
  • Suggested study methods to use in this course, especially The method of three passes. The latter details a way to study physics systematically over several days each week that optimizes understanding given a reasonable investment of effort.
As you might expect, some of these documents may change during the course of the semester, especially if events like hurricanes or earthquakes or terrorist attacks (all of which have been factors in the years I've been teaching) intervene to introduce a delay. I will try to announce it in class if an updated version has been posted, but it is still sensible to come back and check from time to time.



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Physics 54 Syllabus

This Syllabus is provided for the benefit of the students taking Physics 54 from me at Duke during the regular semester. Others who discover it online are welcome to use and peruse it and associated resources online for the purpose of teaching or learning physics.



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Physics 54 Syllabus (summer)

This Syllabus is provided for the benefit of the students taking Physics 54, summer session, at the Duke Marine Biology program in Beaufort. Others who discover it online are welcome to use and peruse it and associated resources online for the purpose of teaching or learning physics.



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Physics 55 Syllabus

Syllabus for Astronomy (Physics 55) is provided for the benefit of my current (summer 2010) Duke Physics Class. Others who discover it online are welcome to use and peruse it and associated resources online for the purpose of teaching or learning physics. All other use must conform to the Open Publication License published on this website.




Review Problems

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41/53/61 Review Guide

Review Guide and Problems for Introductory Physics I is a collection of problems that have been given as quiz questions, hour exam question, final exam questions, or homework in various physics classes of years past.

The content that they cover corresponds to that covered in Introductory Physics I, an online textbook also found on this website. It is basically introductory Newtonian Mechanics plus applications of mechanics to fluids, gravitation, oscillations and waves.

At Duke the course numbers they embrace (support) include 41, 53 and 61. At other schools the numbering will be different and the usefulness of the problems will need to be determined by looking them (and the associated textbook) over.

These problems are made openly and freely available to all students or instructors of physics at Duke or elsewhere subject to the conditions in the Open Publication License contained in the document itself. Basically this prohibits reselling any portion of the document for a profit (without arranging to give me some) and has a suggestion for how truly ethical students or instructors can make a small contribution to my physical well-being if the spirit so moves them.



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42/54/62 Review Guide

Review Guide and Problems for Introductory Physics II is a collection of problems that have been given as quiz questions, hour exam question, final exam questions, or homework in various physics classes of years past.

The content that they cover corresponds to that covered in Introductory Physics II, an online textbook also found on this website. It is basically introductory Electricity and Magnetism, plus introductory Optics (as a natural extension of Electricity and Magnetism, given that light is an electromagnetic wave).

At Duke the course numbers they embrace include 42, 54 and 64. At other schools the numbering will be different and the usefulness of the problems will need to be determined by looking them (and the associated textbook) over.

These problems are made openly and freely available to all students or instructors of physics at Duke or elsewhere subject to the conditions in the Open Publication License contained in the document itself. Basically this prohibits reselling any portion of the document for a profit (without arranging to give me some) and has a suggestion for how truly ethical students or instructors can make a small contribution to my physical well-being if the spirit so moves them.



Old Stuff! No Warranties!

Physics 231 Notes

Lecture notes for Physics 231 (Mathematical Methods of Physics and Electrodynamics). They are quite obsolete and were never finished, but there is some nice stuff. It will all be eaten by the math textbook and electrodynamics textbook above in the fullness of time, but in the meantime, there is some useful stuff in here for the senior major or graduate student.
Home Physics 41 Physics 42 Physics 53 Physics 53 (Summer) Physics 54 Physics 54 (Summer) Physics 55 (Summer)
Introductory Physics I Review Problems for Intro Physics I Introductory Physics II Equations du Jour (Old Intro Physics II) Review Problems for Intro Physics II Introductory Physics III Mathematics for Introductory Physics Classical Electrodynamics
Physics 319 Physics 231: Mathematical Methods for Physics Videos of Physics 53 Lectures One Page Calculus Review Identities for Electrodynamics Contact About

This page is maintained by Robert G. Brown, available at rgb at phy dot duke dot edu. This address is also associated with rgbatduke in e.g. stumbleupon or google code, in case you are looking.