STS

Energy in the 21st Century and Beyond

Concepts of energy from a scientific perspective for understanding problems of energy conversion, storage, and transmission in modern society. Topics include fundamental concepts (kinetic and potential energy, heat, basic thermodynamics, mass-energy equivalence), established power generation methods and their environmental impacts, emerging and proposed technologies (solar, wind, tidal, advanced fusion concepts). Final team project. Sophomores, juniors, and seniors from non-science majors are particularly encouraged to attend; no previous knowledge of physics is assumed.

Introductory Seminar on Big Questions in Physics

Introduction to six big questions representing frontiers of 21st century physics, such as what are the ultimate laws of nature, how does complex structure arise, and how can physics benefit society. Classes will involve presentations by researchers and by students, discussions of journal articles, and tours of physics labs involved with related research. Prequisites: Precalculus and at least one quantitative science course at the high school level, such as chemistry or physics. Half course.
 

Introduction to Frontiers of Biophysics

Once-per-week class with goal of introducing students to representative frontiers of biophysics. Course will be a mixture of presentations by researchers, presentations by students of journal articles, and some lab tours. Prerequisites: Knowledge equivalent to Advanced Placement courses in biology, chemistry and physics, or with permission of the instructor. Half course.

Physics Research and the Economy

Analyses of the role of physics in the development of commercial technologies, with emphasis on curiosity driven research. Seminar requiring independent investigations of the intellectual origin of technological devices, with equal attention to physics principles and political or socioeconomic influences on research funding and product development. No prior instruction in physics assumed. One course.

Energy in the 21st Century and Beyond

Concepts of energy from a scientific perspective for understanding problems of energy conversion, storage, and transmission in modern society. Topics include fundamental concepts (kinetic and potential energy, heat, basic thermodynamics, mass-energy equivalence), established power generation methods and their environmental impacts, emerging and proposed technologies (solar, wind, tidal, advanced fusion concepts). Final team project. Sophomores, juniors, and seniors from non-science majors are particularly encouraged to attend; no previous knowledge of physics is assumed. One course.

Introductory Seminar on Big Questions in Physics

Introduction to six big questions representing frontiers of 21st century physics, such as what are the ultimate laws of nature, how does complex structure arise, and how can physics benefit society. Classes will involve presentations by researchers and by students, discussions of journal articles, and tours of physics labs involved with related research. Prerequisites: Precalculus and at least one quantitative science course at the high school level, such as chemistry or physics. One course.

Frontiers of 21st Century Physics

Introduction to six big questions representing frontiers of 21st century physics, such as what are the ultimate laws of nature, how does complex structure arise, and how can physics benefit society. Classes will involve presentations by researchers and by students, discussions of journal articles, and tours of physics labs involved with related research. Prerequisites: Precalculus and at least one quantitative science course at the high school level, such as chemistry or physics. Offered in Duke Kunshan University in Kunshan, China.